Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Books and Catalogs on Chinese and Korean Ceramics

To understand and appreciate more fully Japanese ceramics, one must also know a little bit about both Chinese and Korean ceramics. These are the ones I have in my research library.

CHINESE 

1. Christie's Pictorial History of Chinese Ceramics by Anthony du Boulay (1984) 319 pgs
2. Chinese Export Porcelain for the American Trade 1785-1835 by Jean McLure Mudge (1981)
3. Masterpieces of Chinese Export Porcelain from the Mottahedeh Collection in the Virginia Museum by             David Howard and John Ayers (1981) 80 pgs
4. Masterworks of Chinese Porcelain in the National Palace Museum (1970) 110 pgs
5. Chinese Pottery and Porcelain by R.L. Hobson (1976) 326 pgs
6. Southeby's Fine Chinese & Works of Art New York 23 March 2011
7. Doyle New York, Asian Works of Art Monday March 21, 2011
8. Chinese Porcelain for the Japanese Market Ko-sometsuke Jorge Welsh (2013)
9. Tang Ceramics Changsha Kilns by Timothy See-Yiu Lam  (1990)

KOREAN

1. Korean Arts of the Eighteenth Century: Spendor & Simplicity (1993) 240 pgs

2. The World of Korean Ceramics by Jon Carter Covell and Alan Covell (1986) 128 pgs



The "Emon's" of Arita (エ門/衛門)

WORK IN PROGRESS********


Saga Prefecture and Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu are known for their ceramics. Many have come to fall under the Arita umbrella of ceramic wares.  Among these many styles of ceramics one will find all sorts of potter names/ and or kilns ending with "emon". It can be quite confusing to both Japanese and foreigners alike.

I will attempt to sort some of them out. *Arita, +Imari, #Hasami, ^Mikawachi/Hirado

The Big Three
*Genemon 源右衛門


*Imaemon 今右衛門

*Kakiemon 柿右衛門

Kakiemon XIII

Others



*Enemon 円左エ門   
*Fukuemon 福右衛門 
*Fumiemon ? 文右エ門
*Kazan ? Kazuemon 華山萬右衛門
*Kin'emon Toen 金右エ門陶苑
*Koemon 幸右エ門
+Kokuemon 国右エ門
*Nishiyama Tokuemon 西山徳右エ門
*Shinemon 
*Shouemon 勝右エ門
*Shoemon 松右エ門
+Tohemon 藤右衛門 http://www.toh-emon.com/
*Tomiemon 富右エ門
*Yazaemon 弥右衛門

Additional notes of Interest:
Koransha was established by another "emon", 8th Fukagawa Eizaemon in 1879.