Wednesday, March 30, 2016

SHIBUKUSA YAKI, KOITO YAKI and YAMADA YAKI-Ceramics of TAKAYAMA, GifuPrefecture

SHIBUKUSA-YAKI
Shibukusa Yaki began in 1840 in TAKAYAMA, Gifu Prefecture. It is influenced by Kutani, its neighbor to the west, and Seto to the east. See "Modern Japanese Ceramics-Pathways of Innovation & Tradition" by Crueger, Crueger and Ito pg. 193 and 204.


                                    Toda Ryuzo


KOITO-YAKI
Oldest of the ceramic types for this area. It. Died out in the early 1800's but was brought back in 1946.
See "Modern Japanese Ceramics-Pathways of Innovation & Tradition" by Crueger, Crueger and Ito Pg 204.

YAMADA-YAKI

Not much is known about the timing of the Yamada kiln. It is considered a folk kiln.
See "Modern Japanese Ceramics-Pathways of Innovation & Tradition" by Crueger, Crueger and Ito Pg 204.

Monday, March 21, 2016

Not All Banko!!


All over the internet you find auction sites that sell "Banko Yaki", but they are not all Banko!! There are a many similar types of wares that have found their way into the "Banko Bucket". 

Itsukaku Yaki (pottery of the Itsukushima Shrine) on Miyajima Island, near Hiroshima. 



Suigetu Yaki (水月焼)

This is pottery made in Matsuyama, Ehime Prefecture on the Island of Shikoku. This ware started in the Meiji Era by Tsunekata Yoshikawa. It usually has a crab crawling out of it somewhere! 
Other potters include:
Sasaki Niroku 佐々木二六

Chinoike Yaki (Shiga Prefecture) (血池焼)
The most common wares are the ceramic faces. They also make similar 3D cups motif cups, vases and such.

Tobe Yaki (砥部焼) 
Tobe Yaki is pottery of Ehime Prefecture. It is most noted for its blue and white porcelain. Some of the wares resemble 3D wares described as Banko in on-line auctions. A shrine or trees are carved into part of the work creating an indented 3D scene. 


Doro Yaki  (mud fired)

Doro Yaki seems to be a generic term for Banko and similar items being exported.

Yashima Yaki (aka Rinzo Yaki)




Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Eiwa Kinsei (栄和謹製)

Eiwa Kinsei is generally export porcelain. It appears to have been exported between the mid to late 1950's-1980's. There are black and gold marks which date to the 50's (on lithophane geisha), a blue square mark which seems to have been used around the same time as the black and gold mark, rare red square mark in bone script probably used in the 1960's, and then most widely seen red mark with block script which is from the 1970's on.


This mark is from the mid to late 1950's 




        This is the Eiwa Kinsei mark with the "Ei" in bone script. My feeling
                 is that this may have been used in the 1960's
          

This mark was used during the 1970's~