Thursday, May 19, 2011

KUTANI YAKI (九谷焼き)-Pottery of Ishikawa Prefecture


EXCUSE THE DUST!
*I somehow managed to lose a lot off this page (not quite sure how I did it). I will be rebuilding this page and hopefully I can make it better. Please be patient while I try to restore what I lost.


Kutani ware is from Ishikawa Prefecture.  The markings are usually in red. For more information on Kutani try: http://www.kutani.co.jp/english/kutani350/about_kutani.php


KUTANI FUKU MARKS

     These are made in the style of Ko-Kutani designs with Fuku Mark

GENERIC KUTANI MARKS

                        Decorative mallet and small sake cup
  Top-incised generic Kutani Mark     Bottom-hand painted generic Kutani Blue


     Top cup with crane motif, 九谷 JAPAN, made for export.
            Bottom small dish with peacock motif, 九谷 

             Generic Kaku style used in mid 20th Century. 


                                          This is a lid to a covered bowl, Meiji Era.

                      Old "Hanazume" style cup

       Koma Inu, also known as Shi Shi, Shisa, and foo dog. Generic Incised mark.








       


KUTANI CHOZAN (九谷長山 )



                              Vase in Toyama style (mountain range)

KUTANI EIRAKU



                              In the traditional red and Gold
         Top-Meoto or Husband/wife cups     Bottom-sake cup

                                        Large sake cup

KUTANI EIZAN


                              27.5 cm  vase, marked with KUTANI (九谷) Eizan (栄山)  Aka..Araki Eizan



                                                                       Large vase




           Koma Inu with sword in mouth. KUTANI Hachi Ei or Hachi You Gama (八栄窯).

HANA KUTANI (九谷)


                                  Matcha Chawan, tea bowl used in the tea ceremony


KUTANI KASEN (九谷華仙)



                                           Vase with KUTANI (九谷) Kasen (華仙 ) Mark

KUTANI KOSEN (九谷光仙)

 The Kosen kiln produces many pieces in the Yoshidaya style 

KUTANI NANSHUN (南春)

     This charger is done in the Takasago style, based on a Noh play about an old couple.

KUTANI NIPPON TOUGEI 

This tea cup is from a set of five, the traditional number used for sets.


KUTANI RYUZAN (九谷隆山)

This is a choka (チョカ) used for warming sake.



KUTANI SOSHU (九谷宗秀) Known for his "Ginsai", silver leaf style


                                       20 cm tall Blue/silver vase


         Pink/Silver sake cup


Here are some links to similar items of the same kiln:

KUTANI TAIZAN 



KUTANI TOUMEI

                  Tea cup (Yunomi) 

KUTANI TOUSEN (九谷陶泉)




Small 7 piece Kutani tea set with Saiji writing, Tousen signature on the box




KUTANI SEIHO (九谷正峰)

                                             Sake cup









KUTANI SHOGETSU (九谷松月)



              Kutani meoto (husband-wife) cups with Camillia flowers


KUTANI SHOZA and MOKUBEI (Reproductions or made in the style of)


KUTANI KINZAN  (九谷金山) *best guess on the reading 

)

Lidded  husband/wife  tea cups with miniature writing (saiji) and blue dot (ao chibu) technique.




3 tiered Obento Takahashi Mark-filed under Kutani on a few sites I have researched
                   HOWEVER, the mark reads Dai Ichi Toki 第弌陶器 which is a different company. 

Takahashi three tier bento



Kutani sake set





KUTANI RYUSEN (九谷龍仙)

Kutani Ryusen


For celebration at Ohara Hachiman Jinja (1981) Kutani Ryusen MARK

KUTANI MARUYAMA


   

KUTANI KAKUZAN


A sake set with two tokkuri and five cups




KAGA KUTANI 

                                         A sake tokkuri 


KUTANI SEI

Small bajohai style sake cup with kirante deco on the base with saiji writing inside.  
           Kutani Sei (produced by Kutani)  Meiji Era
                                             
KUTANI OGAKU (九谷雄岳) * one possible reading for this kanji. 
                       aka Higashi Tadao 1931-2013

LINK:
http://kutani.co.jp/modules/content2/index.php?id=191

KUTANU YOUHO (九谷勇峰)



                                                              Large vase 

51 comments:

  1. I would like to post what I believe is a 20th Century Kutani mark on a beautiful coffee or tea pot. How do I do that?

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  2. Jerry,
    I only post my own pieces on my blog. Did you have a mark you needed help with?

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  3. Jerry, I was wondering......do you have a blog? Maybe you could post it there, send me the link and I could comment on it. Just a thought.

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  4. Hi there! Nice blog. I'm wondering if you could help me ID a piece I've been trying to figure out for years and years? Can I email you some pictures?

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  5. I want to help people but for security and privacy reasons I do not give out my email address. If you have a web page, a blog, or are on Pinterest where you could post the pieces I could try to assist you.

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    1. Thank you, Marmie. I totally understand the email thing. I think you should be able to access these pics that I have stored online at Tinypic, using these URL's.

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv1avr/4

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv0vie/4

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv0vi1/4

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv0vhy/4

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv0vhx/4

      http://tinypic.com/m/hv0vhv/4

      Any help you can offer is most deeply appreciated. I have about driven myself crazy trying to ID this beautiful piece. I'm quite sure this was an art pottery piece made for the domestic Japanese market; the box unfortunately was not with it when I purchased it from a thrift shop in Arizona 12 years ago. The folks at the thrift shop knew nothing about it; it had been turned in as a donation without remark from the previous owner.
      Thanks again,
      Norma

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    2. Norma, I tried to access your pictures but was only able to get to the homepage of tiny pics. Perhaps to see individual photos one must be a member? Or if your links were clickable I might be able to get in? I really would like to help if I can.

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    3. Marmie,
      It's possible only the tinypic accountholder can access those links. I've copied the tinypic IMG codes for you, they're meant to be used for posting to forums and message boards, perhaps you can access these?
      [IMG]http://i42.tinypic.com/293hvgx.jpg[/IMG]
      [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/11rtbtx.jpg[/IMG]
      [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/30jshae.jpg[/IMG]
      [IMG]http://i41.tinypic.com/2jw8zo.jpg[/IMG]
      [IMG]http://i43.tinypic.com/2druam1.jpg[/IMG]
      [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/2zhl6y9.jpg[/IMG]
      Thanks!
      Norma

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    4. I hope I found the right vase with the link you sent, a turquoise blue round vase? This is a Shigaraki vase made by Misugi (美杉 ). I searched high and low for a similar one but to no avail. This was probably made factory style by Misugi. I found another vase signed Misugi on line which was sold by Yamajo Touki. Since there are so few signed Misugi I would assume that they no longer make them. The vase is not traditional Shigaraki ware as Shigaraki is usually rather rustic, using natural glazes. That being said, I believe there was a time when they experimented more with "modern" styles, perhaps to attract the younger generation. It seems to have been short lived, as most Shigaraki pottery today is done in the natural traditional style. I hope this helps.

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    5. I forgot to add the age of the piece. My guess as far as a time frame would be later 20th century.

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    6. Marmie,
      I am truly indebted to you, thank you so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You've brought my search to an end, with more info than I'd hoped for. I wish you much success with this blog, and hope that many other people discover you and take advantage of the wonderful learning tool you offer to help spread the appreciation of Japanese ceramic arts.
      Most sincerely,
      Norma

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  6. Marmie,
    I just remembered I had posted an info request to the ebay discussion boards last August. That link is still active, and contains the photos.
    Here's the URL:
    http://community.ebay.com/t5/Pottery-Glass-Porcelain/Japanese-pottery-vase-ID-maker-amp-date-help/m-p/17208227#M44452
    I hope that works for you.
    Norma

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. Marmie,
    So Shiga is where the little Tanukis come from? I have one of them, and I absolutely adore him! I also have a set of three tiny little owls that I'm pretty sure are the same type of ware.

    I'm hoping you'll be willing to answer a few more questions for me, since I'm clueless when it comes to Asian art. I'm a fairly knowledgable antiques and collectibles enthusiast, but my identification abilities stop short at foreign alphabets.

    As I understand you, the village where the vase was made is Shiga? So, is Misugi the name of the artist who designed the piece, or is Misugi the name of the factory where it was produced? As I understand you, this piece was molded and then incised and glazed by production workers, and not an individual artist? Also, I've found reference to a man named Takatoshi Misugi who wrote quite a few books on ceramics; does he have any connection with this piece?

    I found a like-shaped and finished vase at this link: http://www.fareastasianart.com/stores/ICHIBAN/items/494875/item494875fareastasianart.html That vase has the earthy colored glazes that you mention as being characteristic of Shigaraki. It is priced at $275.00. So, does the odd experimental glaze color used on my vase make it less valuable?

    I am semi-retired, and have a lifetime accumulation of stuff that I'm working on liquidating a little at a time. I plan to offer this vase for sale on eBay. I have had it carefully stored the past twelve years, and it kills me to part with it because I truly love it. However, it goes unseen in storage because I've always been afraid to display it. This is due to the fact that I have three kitty cats with no special regard for delicate valuables that occupy desirable perch spots.

    I'm very particular about getting factual information about items I offer on eBay, since I have an excellent reputation that I wish to preserve. I'd be extremely grateful if you'd be gracious enough to answer any of these additional questions. I have already sold off several Japanese items from my collection over the past two years, and I always donate some of the proceeds to the Fukushima victims. Such will be the case when I sell this vase, too, unless you have another favorite Japanese charity to suggest?

    Thanks again for all your help, and I appreciate any of this additional info you might be able to offer.



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    1. Shigaraki pottery is in Shiga Prefecture. yes, it is famous for the tanuki figures. there are several towns that produce Shigaraki pottery in that region. The vase you have is signed Misugi. Whether that is the kiln name or the name of the artist is unclear. As I mentioned I did find another vase signed Misugi that was sold by Yamajo Touki. I assume this was made by a group rather than by an individual artist. I do not think Takatoshi Misugi is related. let me check out the reference you sent and get back to you on that.

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    2. I checked that vase out at fareastasianart. I think it is way over priced, especially since it is probably a factory made vase. I did not find any reference in Japanese to a specific artist named Misugi. Now, that does not mean there isn't one, just that I could not find one.
      Good luck with your sales and thank you for your generous donations for Fukushima. I felt that earthquake even though I was 350 miles away. All of Japan was affected in the aftermath!!

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    3. Thanks once again Marmie, You've been a godsend!!!
      Best Regards,
      Norma

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  8. Hi! I was hoping you might be able to help me identify the maker of a little green vase I found in a box I got at an estate sale? I put some pictures on pinterest but don't really use pinterest so not sure exactly how it works. LOL Here is my pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/laurianderson96/my-little-vase/ Thank you so much in advance for any help/info. Lauri

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    1. Lauri,
      You purchased a Kutani piece. It is a tea cup, but the mark in the picture is upside down. This generic Kutani mark was used in the mid 20th century, probably between 1940's -1960's. Those dates are not firm but will give you a general idea of the date made. Enjoy your cup, or vase if you choose to use it that way.

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  9. Hello and thank you ahead of time, for your time and help! I have 3 cups and 5 saucers that I purchased at an estate sale several months ago and have been trying to identify ever since. Can you help me? This is a link to Photo Bucket and I hope I am copying the correct link. http://s1277.photobucket.com/user/mj1957/library/Yamaka%20China

    I copied and pasted the link in a new browser and it took me to the china, hopefully this will take you to the pictures of my cups and saucers. The markings on the bottom say Yamaka, but I have googled everything I can think of and do not find this pattern or that mark. I do find Yamaka, but nothing like these. Any info would help me rest at night! It is a mystery that is keeping me up at night! Thanks!

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    1. Mary,
      I was unable to locate your exact mark. A similar mark can be found on a sight called Cathy's Made in Occupied Japan Page, under Yamaka. Your mark is similar but I believe it is a mark made only for the domestic Japanese market. The mark is a bit blurry but under the bird picture in Japanese it says Yamaka Shoten (illegible) Ki, which is Yamaka merchant shop. Yamaka china was established in 1913 in Gifu prefecture. Most china making stopped during the war with the exception of Noritake, I believe. After the war (1945-1952) pieces were marked "Made in Occupied Japan". I don't think this applies to the china made solely for the domestic Japanese market. Given the style and design of the pieces and the mark on the back I would venture to guess it was made in the early 1950's, however I have seen some of the same straight handle designs used in the 1930's. The lithophane image was very popular after the war with many GI's returning home with geisha image tea cups. Lithophane was also produced before the war so there is a slight possibility these could have been produced before the war. I was not able to find anything helpful in Japanese either. I am not sure if this helps you but I will keep a look out!

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  10. Marmie, What a wonderful fund of knowledge you have accumulated on your site. Congratulations. I have a Japanese vase with the following mark and have not been able to find the like of it anywhere. Do you have any idea what the mark is? Here is an image: http://tinyurl.com/oxdy6rr - many thanks in anticipation - Luis Porretta

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    1. The mark at the link you sent me is upside down. The mark appears to be Kutani Sengaku (九谷泉岳). After researching the Japanese auction websites I see that works by this potter sell anywhere from 500 yen to 3000 yen ($5-$30USD) in Japan. Since the vase is not pictured in your link and no size or dimensions are given it is hard to compare to ones I have seen on line. Of course one must consider the shipping charges from Japan which would add to the cost greatly. Good luck.

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  11. Your site is a real gem and so informative.
    Thank you for taking the time to create it.

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    1. Thank you for taking time to comment. I hope it helps.

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  12. This is an amazing! Thank you Marmie for sharing the knowledge!

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  13. Thank you for your kind comment. I hope what I post will be helpful to fellow lovers of Japanese ceramics.

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  14. Hello Marmie,

    What a wonderful blog! Thank you for doing it.

    I came upon some Yumoni cups (I believe) I received when I was in Japan in the 1980s. There are no markings, but they come in a box with a pamphlet, I have posted pictures on Photobucket. If you have any idea of what they are, I would so appreciate it!

    Thank you so much for your time!
    http://s1369.photobucket.com/user/cowboytommy/library/Yumoni%20cups

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    1. The YUNOMI set you have is MASHIKO-yaki. It is folk Pottery, known as Mingei. It is not unusual to not have a mark on Mingei pottery. Although my Japanese reading ability is limited I can tell you that you bought it at Kenmoku Mingei Ten, or Kenmoku folk pottery store. They are lovely cups.

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    2. Thank you Marmie!

      You really know your stuff!

      :)

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    3. Hello again!

      I came across another box of pottery - probably folk pottery as. I have a set of 6 cups and saucers. Again, no markings, but there is a sticker on the cups. I've added two photos to the link above.

      http://s1369.photobucket.com/user/cowboytommy/library/Yumoni%20cups

      Thank you in advance!

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    4. The cups and saucer set is Kasama Pottery of Ibaraki Prefecture

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    5. You are amazing!

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  15. Hi I have what I believe is a Kutani vase but not sure on maker and age can you help?

    https://www.etsy.com/listing/192665350/japanese-kutani-vase-gold-trim-rim-mark

    Thanks in advance! Love your blog so resourceful!!

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    1. I agree that it reads Kutani Shogetsu, but I cannot find an exact match on any Japanese site. It is hard to identify marks sometimes as potters carry names from past generations. Sometimes they even begin with one mark and then change to another mark at different points in their careers. I am not really qualified to date your piece but it does not seem to be recent. I could not even find a similar design. I will keep an eye open. FYI, vases signed Kutani Sogetsu on Japanese auction sites seem to range from around $10-$150. I am sure the discepency can be explained by which Shogetsu made it as well as the knowledge or ignorance of the seller.

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  16. Yes I can not find another like it. I priced it high because of that. I figured it was a mid century piece. But now I am thinking it may be older. I appreciate your insight, keep me posted if you discover anything interesting! Thanks

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  17. HI Marmie,
    You were so helpful in helping once in identifying a mark for me, I was hoping I could ask again.
    I recently purchased a chinese vase from an estate sell. The estate was an old hotel that had opened in early 1900's and closed in 1960. Supposedly the belongings of the hotel had been in storage ever since. I am wondering what type of vase this is and what the mark is. Can you give me an idea of the age too? Thank you so much. I posted pics on Photobucket.
    http://s1277.photobucket.com/user/mj1957/library/Chinese%20Vase

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    1. In am on the road right now but hope to get to this once I get back home. I will do what I can, but can not make any promises, especially if it is Chinese as this is not my specialty. Thanks for becoming a follower on my blog.

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    2. Oh my goodness, I realize now that I am so ignorant to the subject that i am not sure if this is Chinese or Japanese! I said Chinese, but am not sure if it is or not. I thank you and will wait for you to return. Any help is appreciated!...Mary

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  18. Mary, I believe what you have is a Kaga (Kutani) Matsubara made vase. The mark reads Matsubara Sei. Although it does not have Kaga or Kutani written on the bottom, it does appear to be in the Kaga Kutani style circa 1900. You may wish to also Google Matsubara Kutani and research additionally on your own.Good luck!

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  19. Marmie, thank you and I certainly will Google that. Do you think it could be as old as early 1900's?

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    1. Yes, it could have been made through the first part of the 20th century according to what I read....as early as perhaps the 1890's I suppose, although I did not find an exact match.

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  20. Also, what does Matsubara Sei mean or represent? Is that the name of the region/place, company or artist? I've googled all of the names above but am confused on the meaning of the mark. Thank you for your help...Mary

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    1. Just search for Kutani Matsubara. Sei just means produced by.

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  21. Hello. May I which style would Kutani military sake cups (early 1900s to 1940s) come under? Thank you.

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    1. Feel free to send a picture of the cup and mark to my blog email. marmiet23@gmail.com

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  22. I am looking to identify the markings on a Kutani bowl that seem to read Shimazaki Sei--that is, the characters for island, cape or small peninsula, and produced by. Have you run across this kiln or potter?

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    1. I have not. Feel free to send a picture of the piece and the mark to marmiet23@gmail.com

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  23. i have a friend with a vase she wants to sale and we know nothing bout if i send u some pics can u tell us bout it plz i see an email in post above so will send there tyvm

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