Sunday, May 15, 2011

KOZANGAMA, NOT Kosanyo (OR Arita Kazangama)

                                               
Serving Platter "Seika Ryokusai Rinka" Collection

                                
                                               Mug from the "Seika Rokusai Rinka" Collection






Serving bowl "Seika Ryokusai Rinka" Collection



Kozangama- Maebata China Corporation, Tajimi City, Gifu, Japan.
This is minoyaki. I have seen some sites with pottery from Kozangama labeled as Imari or Aritayaki. 
Many have also identified the kiln as Kosan-yo which is another reading but not the one used by the Maebata company.  Others confuse Kozangama with Arita's  Kazangama. See my post on the difference between the two marks.




One of my favorite and a popular design is the "Seika Ryokusai Rinka" collection (shown above). This collection has many pieces.


Kozangama five piece bowl set


                             
                                          Close up of set of five bowls with back stamp of Kozangama





                                           


12 comments:

  1. I only post my own pieces. Did you have a question about a piece you own? I would like to help if I can.

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  2. Hello. I have a vase with the seika ryokusai rinka collection design that my husband purchased at a flea market in Fukuoka. Have you found a source of information about this line of pottery?

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    1. This is a "line" of pottery by the Kozan kiln (Kozangama), Maebata Company in Gifu Prefreecture. It is one of the most popular lines that they have. There are many pieces in this line including: vases, plates, cups, bowls, tea sets, and more. This line has been in existence from at least the 1980's as that is when I got my first piece.

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  3. I also have a set of these dishes. can they still be ordered? They are beautiful

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    1. This line is still carried in many department stores in Japan. Even the small local shop in my neighborhood here in Osaka has several pieces. I sometimes see pieces on ebay as well. I do not know where you live, but if you live in Japan you should be able to find what you are looking for. If you live outside of Japan you may have to rely on e-bay, Rakuten, Amazon, etsy and other auction sites.

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  4. As part of the disclaimer you state we shouldn't use any of this information to authenticate our pieces but it was very helpful in finding out who made the piece i own. I saw the exact same piece on ebay labeled as arita kasan but it is in fact kozangama of mino.

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    1. I try to make sure that what I post is accurate, but sometimes I notice a mistake and correct it. I just don't want sellers to use me as a certification of authenticity! I am not a professional appraiser, this is my hobby. There are lots of people out there on ebay and etsy selling stuff with incorrect information, some innocent, some intentional.

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  5. If I have a piece in the Seika Ryokusai Rinka line that I am selling. It's a serving dish. What is usually a good starting point. Not asking you to verify it is a piece in the line, just wondering a good price point to start at. Thanks for any help!

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    1. Your question is difficult to answer. I do not know the size of the dish, it's condition, nor it's age. I can tell you that that the current retail price in Japan for the large serving dish is 4200 yen or @$42 and the smaller serving dish is 3150 yen or @ $31.
      See www.maebata.co.jp/

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  6. hi,
    Ive just had great fun discovering what my beautiful 50p finds from a junk shop are! Sad that they are not worth a fortune, but I love them,and feel inspired to search into more of the markings on the back of Japanese dishes. Thanks,
    Berry

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    1. What is value? If you really like something it is valuable to you. So, unless you are trying to get rich selling it then it doesn't really matter. People don't seem to care about fancy china these days......lucky for you! Now you can enjoy it. I hope you have fun learning more about Japanese ceramics.

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